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A.J. CRADDOCK's PERSONAL COLLECTION OF EAR&H
PUBLICITY PHOTOS GIVEN TO HIM DURING A VISIT TO THE
NAIROBI HQ IN 1954

 


Amazingly the EAR&H Nairobi “brass” had heard of my exploits driving the trains in Tanganyika
(see bio on previous page)
 

The Tabora (Tanganyika) Shed

(my home away from home in 1952/54 - we lived about a mile away on Boma Road)

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The sad remains of the historic Tabora shed, which was originally built by the Germans, can be seen on Google Maps
at coordinates -5.017802,32.81864
 

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“A typical example of a locomotive depot of the roundhouse
design.  It is at Tabora & was built by the Germans before
the first world war.”

Engine numbers in the picture were inserted by myself.  Photo is from the 1953/54 era

On the turntable 2002 4-6-0 20 Class from Bombay Baroda Railway.

Left to Right in the shed.
2606, 2511, 2601, 8101 (diesel shunter), 2503, 2506, 2508, 2608, 2611, 2607, 2610

We were still wood burning at the time of the photo.

The remains of the shed can be seen by satellite map on Google at -5.017858, 32.818665

— o —

Graham Roberts of the East Africa Steam Group comments:

"Tabora shed: this is EAR&H negative 411/1.
Another shot taken at the same time exists (411/2), showing the shed from the viewpoint of the oil drums in the background."


Tabora Station circa 2002 - little changed since I last saw it in 1954
photo by Ariadne Van Zandbergen
The Africa Image Library


 

5903

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negative is 912/1 (Graham Roberts)


 

8206 Hunslet Diesel Shunter

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original description notes this is at Dar es Salaam shed (Graham Roberts)


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2804 “KILIFI”

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This is the photo featured in Volume 2, Issue #2 of the April 1955 EAR&H Magazine on Page 57 (scan page 22)
describing the 28 Class

 

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5608 being unloaded at Mombasa

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This is a fascinating shot because it shows the locomotive which eventually became 6002 prior to its re-numbering.
The only essential difference of the 60 class from the 56s was the ratio of fuel and water capacity, and the 60s were
originally ordered as an extension of the 56 class.
This photo confirms that Franco-Belge supplied numberplates to the official pattern in the 56xx series.
—
Graham Roberts
 

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3101 “BAGANDA”

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Evidently at the official naming ceremony, judging by the platform: the colonial administration saw the PR possibilities
 of naming the locos after tribes, and often arranged for a colourful naming ceremony with tribal representatives in traditional garb.
The wooden box structure on the running-plate had a set of curtains with a draw-cord so the nameplate could be revealed at the
appropriate moment.
Maybe some of the group members who were in Africa in the 1950s remember these ceremonies and could describe them?
—Graham Roberts

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Graeme Pilkington writes:

 3101 is indeed one of the 55/6 Vulcan locomotives which were referred to as a class 31 by EAR.

I also have the original tender drawing somewhere done to win the contract issued by the British government

 



79 “UASIN GISHU” - KUR

Date and details unknown - probably 1939
See http://www.garrattmaker.com/history.html
4-8-4 + 4-8-4 configuration

Note the “Bwana Mkubwa” hat on driver!

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Negative is 75/5. No location is given but it must be the headshunt to the east of Nairobi shed, where so many of the "official" photos of locos were taken,
since it provided a plain background and was handy for both the shed and the publicity department at railways HQ.  Graham Roberts
 


5402

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The copy in the Nairobi Museum gives the location as Limuru. Graham Roberts

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50 Class being scrapped

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50

Henry Gunston of Wantage, UK (and the Yahoo Group East African Steam) writes:

“The loco "no 50" (on which you had no information) was a "Sentinel" geared steam shunter, as used on Tanganyika Railways (their class "GSL").
The locomotive design was developed by the Sentinel Waggon Works from steam lorry practice.
According to Roelant Ramaer's book "Gari la Moshi", no 50 was "Sentinel" no 7965 of 1929.
 
Eight "GSL"s were supplied - the rest in 1931, and apparently some survived as shunters until the mid 1950s.
 
I liked you range of shots of the "EA" class 2-8-2s on the Kenya & Uganda line. They had sadly gone when I first started work in Kenya in 1968.”
 
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2804 “KILIFI”

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2428

1st of August, 1953, on the occasion of the opening of the first section of the Western Uganda extension from
Kampala to Mityani.  (See EAR&H Magazine Volume 1 #6 Page 8 onwards)

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5902

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Note the locomotive has not yet been named. She became "Ruwenzori Mountains". Graham Roberts

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2804 “KILIFI”

MIKADO (denotes 2-8-2 configuration)

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The final shot, of 2804, has a more elaborate caption on the Museum's copy print: 'EA class No 1 "Kilifi". Nairobi. 1948.
Has covered 1,023,000 miles since 1928 and did 8225 in March 1948. Runs between Nairobi and Mombasa.'.

—Graham Roberts

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END OF EAR&H PHOTOS